Link to WLCI home page
Conserving world-class wildlife resources. Facilitating responsible development.

Invasive Species Treatment Projects

  • Bitter Creek Tamarix Removal

    This project involves both biological and herbicide control of tamarix (salt cedar). Biological control agents (beetles) will be introduced into the tamarix stands. Chemical controls will also be used to ensure stand removal. This project controls invasive species in riparian areas to reduce economic and ecological impacts. These impacts are especially acute in riparian ecosystems. This collaborative effort with Sweetwater County leverages available resources. 2008 Update: Four hundred (400) acres of weed treatments were applied, including the tamarisk and perennial pepperweed treatment along Little Bitter Creek and Red Creek. 2009 Update: The beetles for the biological control of the tamarix in the Bitter Creek has some issues: An [...] (Read More)

  • Blacks Fork River Tamarix Removal

    The project and funding will be spread over a 5 year period beginning in 2008. The project will consist of controlling and eradicating Tamarix (Salt Cedar) along Muddy Creek, Blacks Fork River, and their tributaries. The project will be labor intensive. The project will consist of individual spot treatments spraying of the seedling, young and mature salt cedar plants, and cutting (chain saw or other methods of cutting down) the larger mature salt cedar plants and swabbing the stumps with herbicides. Herbicides used need to be on the BLM approved chemical list and label followed for applications. The herbicides are most effective when a colorant is used to mark plants treated and a penetrating oil used with the herbicide. The project [...] (Read More)

  • Boulder Jonah Cheatgrass

    The strategy for this project will incorporate Fall and Spring treatments of BLM approved herbicide on approximately 100 acres. Following treatments will not exceed 1000 acres per treatment year. The Sublette County Weed and Pest is also providing support for this project through aerial, roadside, and follow-up backpack applications. They are also supplying herbicides for the initial treatment. Habitat classification are mixed cool season grasses, Big Sagebrush communities, winter range for Mule Deer, moose, pygmy rabbit, and brood rearing habitat for sage-grouse. This area is not an active allotment; however, due to treatment timing grazing will not be affected. Livestock management will not be affected but grazing management will [...] (Read More)

  • Condict Ranch Habitat Improvements II

    Project Synopsis: habitat conditions for both livestock and wildlife are less than desired due, in part, to past management practices on the ranch and inability to better control current cattle grazing location and timing. Plans are to provide water (successful water well drilled in 2011) and fencing for grazing management, habitat improvements on mule deer winter range including invasive plant species (juniper and cheatgrass) control, and riparian improvements in Wood Draw to remove invasive juniper and control noxious weeds including musk thistle and leafy spurge. (Read More)

  • Ferris Mountain Leafy Spurge and Russian Knapweed Treatment

    Invasive weed treatments in the Ferris Mountain Wilderness Study Area (WSA) and adjacent Hogback ridges. Monitoring in 2005 showed actual infestation into the WSA for the first time, along with marked increase of acres infested along the fringes in this wildlife-rich WSA. These weeds are also increasing in the adjacent hogback ridges. This area is rugged and scenic with few access points. Treatment consists of herbicide application to control weeds. Retention of native vegetation benefits crucial winter habitat for bighorn sheep, sage-grouse, and other native wildlife. 2009 Update: We reported 400 acres treated, most of that was photo monitored with current patch information collected to show trend. Additional areas were inventoried [...] (Read More)

  • Flaming Gorge Halogeton

    This project will utilize specific treatments on southwestern Wyoming salt-desert shrublands that have been invaded by halogeton to improve habitat conditions. Treatments to improve habitat conditions will include a variety of soil preparation techniques such as traditional till and minimal till and seeding techniques including drilling and broadcast seeding. Monitoring of these areas will occur post treatment to determine the most effective methods for restoration. Treatment and monitoring of treatments will occur for at least two years as part of this proposal. Background: Western states have experienced overwhelming anthropogenic disturbances in recent decades. This has resulted in the introduction of numerous non-native plant [...] (Read More)

  • Green River Russian Olive - Tamarisk

    Russian olive and tamarisk are two invasive species that have established along the Green River. These two species are poor riparian plants and are outcompeting the native vegetation. Native vegetation is well suited to stabilize stream banks and capture sediment, thereby improving water quality. Currently the Wyoming Game and Fish Department has funded the Teton Science School to conduct an assessment from Fontenelle Dam to the southern end of Seedskadee National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), and the City of Green River is treating Russian olive and Tamarisk on their properties. There is a need to complete an assessment from the southern boundary of Seedskadee NWR to Flaming Gorge Reservoir, initiate control measures and provide plant [...] (Read More)

  • Grey's River Ranger District Noxious Weed Control

    Strategies: a three-pronged approach will continue to be taken during the next three years, with WLCI funds primarily going toward the first "prong" (much of this in the Greys River drainage), and some funds going toward the second "prong": 1. Prevent the successful establishment of noxious weed species not yet established on National Forest System lands in the Greys River Ranger District. 2. Prevent the successful establishment of new infestations of spotted knapweed, leafy spurge, yellow toadflax, and Dyer’s woad beyond existing perimeters along roads, trails, and adjoining lands, and either eliminate existing patches or reduce the density of noxious weed densities to a point in which a native plant diversity is being approximated. [...] (Read More)

  • Hay Reservoir Weed Treatment

    The Hay Reservoir project entails treating approximately 3000 acres for Russian knapweed and salt cedar invasion. Treatment would consist of the ground application of herbicide to control these noxious weeds in the area. There is also whitetop, Canada thistle, black henbane, halogeton, and Swainson’s pea. This area is important to deer, elk, antelope, and many other wildlife species. This project will directly reduce water wastage, erosion, and sedimentation into Hay Reservoir, located in the Great Divide Basin. It will also benefit Red Creek and Hay Reservoir proper, native vegetation, and the wildlife which use the water in this drainage. This area has also failed Standards for Healthy Rangelands due to the invasive plant infestations. [...] (Read More)

  • Inventory and Control of Desert Alyssum in Lower Muddy Creek Watershed

    A combination of efforts has been ongoing to understand the invasive mechanisms of this plant (Desert Alyssum) to spread and how to control it. A chemical application will be used in an effort to gain control of Desert Alyssum. This area has crucial winter range for antelope, deer and elk, and also has sage grouse wintering areas, brood-rearing habitat, as well as numerous leks. This funding would benefit the immediate area through the inventory and removal of Desert Alyssum which is competing with native vegetation. Monitoring transects have shown an increase in perennial plant spacing where Alyssum is dominant. Removal of Alyssum would improve or maintain habitat for wildlife and livestock using this area. Several factors including [...] (Read More)

  • Lincoln and Uinta County Invasives

    This project represents a continuation and expansion from the KFO’s 2004 CCI Project #21055 - Bear River Cooperative Weed Management. This project is for spraying and biological control of all Invasive/Noxious Weeds within the Kemmerer Field Office (KFO) area within Lincoln and Uinta Counties. Funding costs includes hiring seasonal staff and a vehicle to continue inventorying and mapping of weeds within the area. In 2009, 1,000 acres of weeds will be treated on BLM lands and 1,000 treated acres will be evaluated. Efforts will first be directed to areas where the resource benefits are most important as identified by the WLCI and the KFO. Maintaining the native vegetative communities and protecting them from invading weed species is [...] (Read More)

  • Muddy Creek Tamarix Removal

    The project and funding will be spread over a 5 year period beginning in 2008. The project will consist of controlling and eradicating Tamarix (Salt Cedar) along Muddy Creek, Blacksfork River, and their tributaries. The project will be labor intensive. The project will consist of individual spot treatments spraying of the seedling, young and mature salt cedar plants, and cutting (chain saw or other methods of cutting down) the larger mature salt cedar plants and swabbing the stumps with herbicides. Herbicides used need to be on the BLM approved chemical list and label followed for applications. The herbicides are most effective when a colorant is used to mark plants treated and a penetrating oil used with the herbicide. The project [...] (Read More)

  • Pepperweed Partnership

    Project Synopsis: this project would fund the labor for mechanical, biological, and chemical applications in an effort to gain control of Perennial pepperweed, Russian knapweed, whitetop, Marsh sowthistle, and saltcedar. The watershed drains into the North Platte River which currently does not have perennial pepperweed. This area has crucial winter range for deer and elk, and yearlong range for antelope. There are sage grouse wintering areas and brood-rearing habitat, as well as numerous leks, and mountain plover. There are perennial streams with several species of willow. There have been efforts to improve Sage Creek proper, which was listed on the 303d list of impaired streams due to habitat degradation, and was subsequently [...] (Read More)

  • Pinedale Field Office Noxious Weed Management

    This project increases the level of control to minimize the economic and ecological impacts caused by invasive species. Controlling noxious weeds is a priority for the BLM and this collaborative effort with Sublette, Lincoln, and Teton Counties reinforces this commitment. The weed infested areas cover sage-grouse, snowshoe hare and lynx habitat, crucial winter range and calving range for mule deer, elk and moose. In addition, grazing allotments, oil and gas leases, adjacent lands (USFS, private, State), and prime recreational hunting areas are also greatly impacted. Integrated methods of weed control are applied, including the use of biological and chemical controls along with hand pulling in select areas. This is also an effort to [...] (Read More)

  • Raymond Mountain Invasives

    This project is to be spread over a minimum of a four year period for the control/eradication of Dalmation Toad Flax and Dyer’s Woad, from private and public lands around and on Raymond Mountain in the Sublette Mountain Range. The Toad Flax and Dyer’s Woad are decreasing the forage available to wildlife in this area as these two noxious weed species continue to expand their populations. For the past five or six years, BLM and Lincoln County Weed and Pest have been spraying and/or releasing biologicals against these weeds, and it is now time to also attack these weeds on the low lands, which are privately owned, eliminating this possible seed source. The benefits to controlling the Dalmation Toadflax and Dyer’s Woad will improve the [...] (Read More)

  • Red Creek Riparian Restoration

    This project involves both biological and herbicide control of tamarisk. It will benefit native plants, special status species, and wildlife. The implementation of this tamerisk control project will result in rehabilitation of degraded streams and riparian areas some of the treated riparian areas are important to maintain viable populations of Colorado River Cutthroat trout. Project includes participation from Sweetwater County, the Bureau of Land Management, and private landowners. (Read More)

  • Red Rim Wildlife Habitat Management Area Improvements

    The objective of the project is to improve the infrastructure of the Red Rim Wildlife Habitat Management Area (WHMA) as well as conduct habitat improvements. Two windmills will be upgraded to solar pumps and panels. Six and a half miles of fence will be converted from woven wire to wildlife friendly fencing and 8 miles of fence will have single strand conversion to meet BLM and WGFD wildlife standards (i.e. the bottom wire is too low or the top wire is too high). An exclosure will be erected around a riparian area to keep cattle out, sagebrush will be thinned (approx. 140 acres), weeds will be treated (approx. 200 acres) and native grasses and legumes sown (approx. 170 acres). The Red Rim WHMA is located southwest of Rawlins, WY [...] (Read More)

  • Sand Creek Saltcedar Control

    The Sand Creek Saltcedar control project is designed to treat approximately thirty (30) miles of stream bottom in the Colorado River Watershed for saltcedar invasion. Treatment will consist of aerial and ground application of herbicide to remove saltcedar from the area. This is potentially threatened Western yellow-billed cuckoo habitat which is being severely degraded with invasive saltcedar. It is also home to wild horses, deer, elk, antelope, and many other wildlife species, as well as one of the headwaters of many sensitive fish species downstream. This project will directly reduce water wastage, erosion and sedimentation, and salt loading into the Little Snake River, a tributary to the Colorado River. This area has also failed [...] (Read More)

  • Sweetwater County Invasive Weed Control

    There is a critical need to increase the level of control to minimize the economic and ecological impacts that invasive species cause. BLM has a commitment to Sweetwater County and private adjacent land owners for controlling weeds. Control of noxious weeds is a priority within the local county and the Bureau. Native wildlife species, including elk, mule deer, greater sage-grouse, mountain plovers, raptors, Colorado River cutthroat trout and many juniper obligates, are dependent on native vegetation for successful breeding, nesting, and food. Protection of their habitats is of primary importance. One community at risk is riparian habitat where invasive weeds are displacing native species. Weeds affect streams by changing the vegetation [...] (Read More)