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Riparian Enhancement Projects

  • Aspen Conservation Joint Venture: Upper Muddy Creek Aspen Restoration Project

    The project will conduct several different forms of forest and rangeland health treatments to improve and restore good health conditions in aspen woodlands and rangelands on roughly between 700,000 to 750,000 acres located in the southwestern portion of Rawlins, WY. The goal is to implement a combination of treatments (mechanical removal of confier encroachment in aspen stands, prescribed burning, hazardous fuels reduction and mechanical brush beating) within identified areas of forest and rangelands within the project area to improve aspen stand, rangeland vegetation, and riparian ecosystem health; improve livestock grazing and wildlife habitat conditions; and reduce hazardous fire fuel build-up within juniper woodlands. This is in [...] (Read More)

  • B-Q Canal Rehabilitation, Wetlands Improvement, and Elk Movement Monitoring

    This project will to improve the irrigated meadows on the Cokeville Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). Engineering and design will be provided to improve the condition of unused irrigation systems and pumps and to install additional head gates and dikes. Rehabilitation of about 7 miles of dike for the B-Q Canal; creating a grass bank at Cokeville Meadows NWR; planting and weed control will restore 1,300 acres of irrigated hay meadows on the Refuge that are currently unproductive; monitoring elk movement east of NWR. This project will improve irrigation efficiency and flooding of approximately 1,300 acres of hay meadows that are currently unproductive. These improvements will increase nesting habitat for the American Bittern, [...] (Read More)

  • Battle Creek Restoration

    This project is an ongoing cooperative project to restore 6,300 feet of Battle Creek and replace two irrigation structures which currently block seasonal fish migration. This joint project will improve native Colorado Cutthroat fish habitat, improve thermal and low flow habitat, and reduce bank erosion. Restoration will include narrowing the channel to accommodate for 590 cfs bankfull flows; excavating pools and installing fish-hook vane structures to improve low flow trout habitat; and re-establishing riparian vegetation to prevent further erosion. At a minimum, the project will include the following: installing 10 fish-hook vanes, excavating 12 pools, installing bank full benches to narrow the channel, installing willow clumps, [...] (Read More)

  • Bitter Creek Restoration 2013

    This is a multi-year project to repair a diversion structure which is preventing a head-cut from continuing upstream. Objectives: 1) Reduce or halt erosion occurring at the headcut. 2) Halt the headcut progression which may infringe on and destabilize upstream railroad, highway, interstate, and mine PMT. 3) Halt the headcut progression into the upstream channel morphology and riparian regime. Strategies: • Detailed runoff and flow analysis to the headcut location for the associated 830 square mile drainage area. • Selection of the acceptable design event/peak design flow for the structure. • Determination of all permitting requirements, timeframes, and responsibilities. • Evaluation of the native material stability and excavation [...] (Read More)

  • Bitter Creek Tamarix Removal

    This project involves both biological and herbicide control of tamarix (salt cedar). Biological control agents (beetles) will be introduced into the tamarix stands. Chemical controls will also be used to ensure stand removal. This project controls invasive species in riparian areas to reduce economic and ecological impacts. These impacts are especially acute in riparian ecosystems. This collaborative effort with Sweetwater County leverages available resources. 2008 Update: Four hundred (400) acres of weed treatments were applied, including the tamarisk and perennial pepperweed treatment along Little Bitter Creek and Red Creek. 2009 Update: The beetles for the biological control of the tamarix in the Bitter Creek has some issues: An [...] (Read More)

  • Blacks Fork River Tamarix Removal

    The project and funding will be spread over a 5 year period beginning in 2008. The project will consist of controlling and eradicating Tamarix (Salt Cedar) along Muddy Creek, Blacks Fork River, and their tributaries. The project will be labor intensive. The project will consist of individual spot treatments spraying of the seedling, young and mature salt cedar plants, and cutting (chain saw or other methods of cutting down) the larger mature salt cedar plants and swabbing the stumps with herbicides. Herbicides used need to be on the BLM approved chemical list and label followed for applications. The herbicides are most effective when a colorant is used to mark plants treated and a penetrating oil used with the herbicide. The project [...] (Read More)

  • BLM Ferris Mountain Prescribed Burn Phase 1

    Project Synopsis: the Ferris Mountain project area consists of mainly timbered slopes, interspersed with upland areas dominated by sagebrush, grass, and mountain shrub communities. Timber stands within the project unit consist of Douglas fir, subalpine fir, spruce, lodgepole pine, limber pine, and aspen, in addition to scattered locations of Rocky Mountain juniper. Long-term suppression of wildfires has promoted the encroachment of conifers into shrublands, aspen stands, and drainages supporting aspen, waterbirch and willows, to the point where many of these communities are non-functional. Decadence and disease is commonly observed in terms of mistletoe, blister rust, and bleeding rust, and pine beetles have killed many of the older [...] (Read More)

  • Buckhorn Flowing Well Exclosures

    The enclosures would protect the Buckhorn Flowing Well (NWNE Sec.9 T24N-R109W) and the riparian/wetland areas it created from the overflow of the well in the Eighteen Mile Allotment. The enclosures would help improve habitat/vegetation/cover (provide brood-rearing habitat for sage grouse), place for wildlife to water, exclusion from livestock and wild horses. The reservoir will still be accessible for livestock and wild horses to water. This project will add a healthy wetland component to the sagebrush ecosystem, improving edge and diversity. The priority for getting done first on this project would be is to protect the water well. Place a small exclosure around the water well to keep wild horses and livestock away from the shed [...] (Read More)

  • Chicken Springs Archeology

    The project involves the recordation and management of a large archaeological complex surrounding Chicken Springs. The site has evidence of long term use and appears remain important to Native American tribes as a traditional cultural property at which ceremonies appear to be ongoing. The site has competing uses being along an access corridor to a developing gas field and having extensive recreational and tourism visitation. The project will record the resource and develop a management plan which will enhance the health of the lands in the area while managing increased demand for minerals and recreation. This project would meet the cultural requirements and also provide a management plan that could include consideration of an exclosure [...] (Read More)

  • Coal Creek Stabilization and Sediment Reduction

    Project Synopsis: improved grazing management over the past decade in the lower Coal Creek drainage has resulted in gradual positive trends in riparian habitat conditions. This project will address degraded habitat conditions not directly related to grazing management and build additional trust and cooperation. The Thomas Fork Habitat Management Plan developed cooperatively by WGFD and BLM in 1979 “to preserve, manage, and enhance BCT habitat” identified sediment contribution from the Coal Creek road as an important issue. In 2010, WGFD hired a consultant to develop conceptual plans to address the large amounts of sediment contributed into the stream at eleven (11) key sites along a two (2) mile stretch of Coal Creek. Although the [...] (Read More)

  • Cokeville Meadows Wetland Improvements

    This project will improve the irrigation meadows on the Cokeville Meadows National Wildlife Refuge. Engineering and Design will be provided to improve the condition of unused irrigation systems and pump and to install additional head gates and dikes. Planting and weed control will be done to restore 1,300 acres of irrigated meadow. This project will improve irrigation efficiency and flooding of approximately 1,300 acres of hay meadows that are currently unproductive. These improvements will increase nesting habitat for the American Bittern, White-face ibises and a variety of other wetland and waterfowl species. Additionally, once permanent vegetation is established the potential to use this area as a grass bank will be explored. This [...] (Read More)

  • Condict Ranch Habitat Improvements II

    Project Synopsis: habitat conditions for both livestock and wildlife are less than desired due, in part, to past management practices on the ranch and inability to better control current cattle grazing location and timing. Plans are to provide water (successful water well drilled in 2011) and fencing for grazing management, habitat improvements on mule deer winter range including invasive plant species (juniper and cheatgrass) control, and riparian improvements in Wood Draw to remove invasive juniper and control noxious weeds including musk thistle and leafy spurge. (Read More)

  • Continental Peak Riparian Exclosure/Oregon Slough

    This project provides for reconstruction of a fence exclosure to enhance riparian and sensitive plant species habitat. The exclosure is in need of repair and its completion will also help achieve Standards for Healthy Rangelands and provide improved grazing management by allowing for rest and recovery of the vegetation within the exclosure boundaries. Wildlife species including elk, deer, antelope, and migratory waterfowl will benefit from this project. Water quality will also be improved. About 41 acres are located within the exclosure. (Read More)

  • Continental Peak Riparian Exclosure/Pacific Creek

    This project provides for the reconstruction of an existing exclosure to improve riparian habitat along Pacific Creek north and east of Rock Springs. This project involves a 130 acre exclosure being rebuilt and improved. A portion of the existing exclosure will be modified to place fencing in a drier more stable area, reducing the need for maintenance. Riparian and wetland habitats, and water quality will be improved and the project will enhance use of the area by wildlife including white faced ibis and migratory waterfowl. Grazing management will also be improved and the project will help achieve Standards for Healthy Rangelands. (Read More)

  • Cottonwood Creek

    The private landowner and the FWS Partners for Fish & Wildlife Program propose to enhance approximately 72.3 acres of wetland through the construction and repair of dikes and water control structures on flood-irrigated land. Projects in the currently irrigated meadows comprise 14.3 acres of the 72.3 acres, which will be completed in the first phase of the project. Irrigation infrastructure will be enhanced to aid in spreading and backing flood-irrigation water on 14.3 acres of land within the approximately 575 acre complex of irrigated wet meadows. More specifically, 7 dikes and 8 water control structures will enhance the landowner’s ability to irrigate the land, while increasing open water in the wetlands. Incremental water control [...] (Read More)

  • Dirtyman Creek Fish Barrier Replacement

    Populations of Colorado River cutthroat trout (CRCT) have experienced dramatic declines throughout their historic range. Current distributions of CRCT are typically limited to isolated headwater streams and lakes. Primary threat to the CRCT is the introduction of non-native salmonids and loss of habitat. A fish barrier on Dirtyman Creek was placed on BLM administered lands to prevent invasion of non-native salmonids and maintain a genetically pure population of Colorado River cutthroat trout. However, the existing structure has degraded over time and needs to be replaced before the integrity of the barrier is lost. The goal of this project is to prevent non-native fish from invading upstream of the existing barrier thus maintaining [...] (Read More)

  • Ferris Mountain Leafy Spurge and Russian Knapweed Treatment

    Invasive weed treatments in the Ferris Mountain Wilderness Study Area (WSA) and adjacent Hogback ridges. Monitoring in 2005 showed actual infestation into the WSA for the first time, along with marked increase of acres infested along the fringes in this wildlife-rich WSA. These weeds are also increasing in the adjacent hogback ridges. This area is rugged and scenic with few access points. Treatment consists of herbicide application to control weeds. Retention of native vegetation benefits crucial winter habitat for bighorn sheep, sage-grouse, and other native wildlife. 2009 Update: We reported 400 acres treated, most of that was photo monitored with current patch information collected to show trend. Additional areas were inventoried [...] (Read More)

  • Fish Migration Enhancements on Upper Big Sandy River

    This project will improve fish movements in the Upper Big Sandy River by fish screen and fish passable irrigation diversion replacement. (Read More)

  • Gooseberry Creek Exclosure

    Construct a riparian exclosure on Gooseberry Creek for habitat protection and enhancement and to improve effectiveness of an erosion control structure. This exclosure will reduce a headcut caused by livestock and wild horses accessing the creek around an existing erosion control structure. The structure was placed to stop migration of a headcut up Gooseberry Creek that would also threaten the County road. 2008 Update: This project enhances and protects water quality in Gooseberry Creek by reducing a headcut forming around an existing erosion control structure. The exclosure (JH) encompasses about six acres and ensures the existing erosion control structure will stay intact and functional. Access to the creek for horses, livestock [...] (Read More)

  • Gooseberry Creek Fish Passage Project

    Due to anthropogenic activities and large stochastic events within the drainage, Gooseberry Creek no longer has a population of CRC above a man made Gabion structure. Gooseberry Creek is a small tributary and cannot support a large population of CRC to persist without connectivity to Trout Creek and Sage Creek. When passage is provided through the structures, approximately 1.5 miles of Gooseberry Creek will be available for CRC and other native fish for spawning, rearing and other life history needs. This project is part of an ongoing effort to improve aquatic and riparian habitat within the Greater Little Mountain area to increase the range of the native Colorado River cutthroat (CRC) trout. The Gooseberry Fish Passage Project [...] (Read More)

  • Green River Riparian Corridor Cottonwood Restoration

    The existing cottonwood gallery forest dates to 1840s making this riparian corridor one of the oldest in North America with many of the individual cottonwoods decadent, of low vigor, and highly susceptible to insects and disease. Recent late springs with heavy snows simulating flood events (moist-soils) have rejuvenated several cottonwood clones that were otherwise considered dead. Initially 37 miles (4400 acres cottonwood forest existing) through the refuge along the Green River, followed by selected reaches from Fontenelle Dam through City of Green River. Total restoration about 50 river-reach miles with estimated average 120 acres per mile cottonwood forest, but width variable with some reaches none-total 6000 acres. Restoration [...] (Read More)

  • Green River Russian Olive - Tamarisk

    Russian olive and tamarisk are two invasive species that have established along the Green River. These two species are poor riparian plants and are outcompeting the native vegetation. Native vegetation is well suited to stabilize stream banks and capture sediment, thereby improving water quality. Currently the Wyoming Game and Fish Department has funded the Teton Science School to conduct an assessment from Fontenelle Dam to the southern end of Seedskadee National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), and the City of Green River is treating Russian olive and Tamarisk on their properties. There is a need to complete an assessment from the southern boundary of Seedskadee NWR to Flaming Gorge Reservoir, initiate control measures and provide plant [...] (Read More)

  • Grey's River Ranger District Noxious Weed Control

    Strategies: a three-pronged approach will continue to be taken during the next three years, with WLCI funds primarily going toward the first "prong" (much of this in the Greys River drainage), and some funds going toward the second "prong": 1. Prevent the successful establishment of noxious weed species not yet established on National Forest System lands in the Greys River Ranger District. 2. Prevent the successful establishment of new infestations of spotted knapweed, leafy spurge, yellow toadflax, and Dyer’s woad beyond existing perimeters along roads, trails, and adjoining lands, and either eliminate existing patches or reduce the density of noxious weed densities to a point in which a native plant diversity is being approximated. [...] (Read More)

  • Hay Reservoir Weed Treatment

    The Hay Reservoir project entails treating approximately 3000 acres for Russian knapweed and salt cedar invasion. Treatment would consist of the ground application of herbicide to control these noxious weeds in the area. There is also whitetop, Canada thistle, black henbane, halogeton, and Swainson’s pea. This area is important to deer, elk, antelope, and many other wildlife species. This project will directly reduce water wastage, erosion, and sedimentation into Hay Reservoir, located in the Great Divide Basin. It will also benefit Red Creek and Hay Reservoir proper, native vegetation, and the wildlife which use the water in this drainage. This area has also failed Standards for Healthy Rangelands due to the invasive plant infestations. [...] (Read More)

  • LaBarge Creek Restoration

    Large long-term project to restore connectivity and fish passage in the LaBarge Creek system. (Read More)

  • Lincoln and Uinta County Invasives

    This project represents a continuation and expansion from the KFO’s 2004 CCI Project #21055 - Bear River Cooperative Weed Management. This project is for spraying and biological control of all Invasive/Noxious Weeds within the Kemmerer Field Office (KFO) area within Lincoln and Uinta Counties. Funding costs includes hiring seasonal staff and a vehicle to continue inventorying and mapping of weeds within the area. In 2009, 1,000 acres of weeds will be treated on BLM lands and 1,000 treated acres will be evaluated. Efforts will first be directed to areas where the resource benefits are most important as identified by the WLCI and the KFO. Maintaining the native vegetative communities and protecting them from invading weed species is [...] (Read More)

  • Little Snake River Restoration

    The objective of this project is to reduce streambank erosion and restore aquatic habitat. The project involves habitat enhancement and improve grazing management along one mile of river. The project involves construction of approximately 1-mile of 3 strand barbed-wire fence along a stretch of the Little Snake River on NFS lands. The fence would meet forest plan standards which allow wildlife movement. One watergap may be incorporated into the fence if needed for livestock watering. Project is located on the Little Snake River in Carbon County, WY approximately three miles below the Three Forks Ranch in T12N, R86W Sec 18 and T12N, R87W, Sec 13. Update: The fence was built by NFS personnel in September, 2009. However, one end of [...] (Read More)

  • Muddy Creek Enhancements (by Wyoming Youth Conservation Corps)

    The Muddy Creek watershed has been identified as having a high conservation value for Wyoming's fish species, big game crucial winter range and parturition areas, myriad neotropical migrant birds, abundant sage-grouse, and occupied habitat for the only population of Columbian sharp-tail grouse in Wyoming. Objectives of this project are to 1) Construct or maintain 4 vegetation exclosure projects, 2) Plant riparian vegetation, 3) improvement projects, monitoring of the area would be conducted to document the success of management efforts and identify areas where improvement is needed. Implementation of this project will benefit a diversity of fish and wildlife resources within an important ecosystem including Colorado River cutthroat, [...] (Read More)

  • Muddy Creek Riparian/Stream Enhancement

    Construct wildlife passable fence to enhance approximately 3,100 feet of riparian habitat and 5,900 feet of stream channel. Three year rest minimum with the development of a long term wildlife and livestock management plan. (Read More)

  • Muddy Creek Tamarix Removal

    The project and funding will be spread over a 5 year period beginning in 2008. The project will consist of controlling and eradicating Tamarix (Salt Cedar) along Muddy Creek, Blacksfork River, and their tributaries. The project will be labor intensive. The project will consist of individual spot treatments spraying of the seedling, young and mature salt cedar plants, and cutting (chain saw or other methods of cutting down) the larger mature salt cedar plants and swabbing the stumps with herbicides. Herbicides used need to be on the BLM approved chemical list and label followed for applications. The herbicides are most effective when a colorant is used to mark plants treated and a penetrating oil used with the herbicide. The project [...] (Read More)

  • Muddy Creek Vegetation Enhancement

    Convert impenetrable sheep fence to more "wildlife friendly" fence to allow passage of pronghorn and other big game species. Provide a number of low-tech erosion and water harvesting measures to improve two-track roads. Construct small rock mulches to improve water infiltration while reducing runoff and soil erosion. With the assistance of the Wyoming Youth Conservation Corp, conduct fence repair and reconstruction. Plant willow and other shrubs. This project would increase the amount and diversity of riparian and transitional riparian/upland habitats. Establishment and expansion of woody species such as willow in riparian areas would provide increased fish stream shading, and armoring of stream banks from erosion. Planting of aspen [...] (Read More)

  • Pepperweed Partnership

    Project Synopsis: this project would fund the labor for mechanical, biological, and chemical applications in an effort to gain control of Perennial pepperweed, Russian knapweed, whitetop, Marsh sowthistle, and saltcedar. The watershed drains into the North Platte River which currently does not have perennial pepperweed. This area has crucial winter range for deer and elk, and yearlong range for antelope. There are sage grouse wintering areas and brood-rearing habitat, as well as numerous leks, and mountain plover. There are perennial streams with several species of willow. There have been efforts to improve Sage Creek proper, which was listed on the 303d list of impaired streams due to habitat degradation, and was subsequently [...] (Read More)

  • Platte Valley Mule Deer Habitat Management (Condit)

    The Platte Valley watershed area between Seminoe Reservoir and the Wyoming/Colorado state line provides important seasonal habitat for a variety of wildlife species including five big game species (mule deer, antelope, elk, bighorn sheep and moose), as well as identified core areas for greater sage grouse, and historic sage grouse ranges outside of core areas. Habitat conditions throughout the watershed center on proper multiple use management, including domestic livestock and wildlife, so that the standards for rangeland health on both uplands and riparian areas are met. The area was reviewed for conformance with the Wyoming Standards and Guidelines for Healthy Rangelands in 2004 and 2005. While the majority of the area met the [...] (Read More)

  • Red Creek Riparian Restoration

    This project involves both biological and herbicide control of tamarisk. It will benefit native plants, special status species, and wildlife. The implementation of this tamerisk control project will result in rehabilitation of degraded streams and riparian areas some of the treated riparian areas are important to maintain viable populations of Colorado River Cutthroat trout. Project includes participation from Sweetwater County, the Bureau of Land Management, and private landowners. (Read More)

  • Red Rim Wildlife Habitat Management Area Improvements

    The objective of the project is to improve the infrastructure of the Red Rim Wildlife Habitat Management Area (WHMA) as well as conduct habitat improvements. Two windmills will be upgraded to solar pumps and panels. Six and a half miles of fence will be converted from woven wire to wildlife friendly fencing and 8 miles of fence will have single strand conversion to meet BLM and WGFD wildlife standards (i.e. the bottom wire is too low or the top wire is too high). An exclosure will be erected around a riparian area to keep cattle out, sagebrush will be thinned (approx. 140 acres), weeds will be treated (approx. 200 acres) and native grasses and legumes sown (approx. 170 acres). The Red Rim WHMA is located southwest of Rawlins, WY [...] (Read More)

  • Riparian Restoration, Carbon County

    This project would increase diversity of forbs and invertebrates in riparian and transitional riparian/upland areas through mowing and seeding of native forb species. A tractor powered mower with a seeder would be used to create an enhanced vegetative mosaic within riparian or transitional riparian areas lacking in vegetative species and structural diversity. A contractor would provide a tractor or seeder for distribution of native seed. This project would focus on improving habitat for a diversity of species, particularly sage grouse and other BLM sensitive avian species such as the Brewer's sparrow and sage thrasher, which rely on riparian habitats for critical brood rearing requirements in the Sand Hills ACEC south of Rawlins. [...] (Read More)

  • Riverside Stream Enhancement Phase II

    Encampment restoration/enhancement effort: This project is just one part of a large effort to improve aquatic and riparian habitat along the Encampment River. Issues at hand include improving irrigation efficiency, eliminating cobble push-up dams that cause river instability during their maintenance and also eliminate them as fish migration barriers. Riparian emphasis focuses on managing grazing near riparian areas as well as reestablishment of the cottonwood gallery. Strategy: The Riverside Stream Enhancement project will use "Natural Channel Design" approach to assess and restore stream channels by moving them toward their potential stable form. Geomorphology, hydrology, drainage, erosion, irrigation and stream bank [...] (Read More)

  • RSFO-Currant Creek Habitat Restoration

    Project Synopsis: the strategy for restoring the habitat on Currant Creek is to permanently exclude unauthorized livestock from the stream and adjacent meadows unless livestock are authorized in the special use pasture. Livestock are only to be permitted to graze every 3rd year for 3 weeks or as approved by authorized officer. (It's been about ten years since grazing has been authorized in the area due to resource concerns.) The most imminent threat to the currant creek habitat is continual cattle drift into the drainage. This results in the unauthorized grazing of riparian vegetation and BLM projects such as willow, aspen, and other woody species plantings. The area is important habitat (ACEC area) for Colorado River cutthroat [...] (Read More)

  • Sage-grouse Core Area Riparian Exclosure Project

    Project Synopsis: BLM Kemmerer Field Office (KFO) proposes to construct riparian exclosures within the “Sage” sage-grouse core area as designated by the Wyoming Governor’s Executive Order (EO 2011-5). During late summer, fall and early winter of 2011 the BLM mapped and inventoried approximately 190 reservoirs and 50 springs/seeps in the Ruby Priority Project area. After compiling 2011 data, the BLM identified several springs/seeps as priorities for protection/enhancement. The springs/seeps are repeatedly grazed to the extent that hummocks are forming or have already formed. Once hummocks form or start to form, the immediate threat is a high soil compaction which could result in a lower water table, the spring/seep migrating uphill, [...] (Read More)

  • Sand Creek Saltcedar Control

    The Sand Creek Saltcedar control project is designed to treat approximately thirty (30) miles of stream bottom in the Colorado River Watershed for saltcedar invasion. Treatment will consist of aerial and ground application of herbicide to remove saltcedar from the area. This is potentially threatened Western yellow-billed cuckoo habitat which is being severely degraded with invasive saltcedar. It is also home to wild horses, deer, elk, antelope, and many other wildlife species, as well as one of the headwaters of many sensitive fish species downstream. This project will directly reduce water wastage, erosion and sedimentation, and salt loading into the Little Snake River, a tributary to the Colorado River. This area has also failed [...] (Read More)

  • Savery Creek Restoration

    This is an ongoing cooperative project to restore 6,100 ft of Savery creek. This joint project will improve native Colorado Cutthroat fish habitat, improve thermal and low flow habitat, and reduce bank erosion by approximately 1,000 cubic yards per year. Restoration will include narrowing the channel to accommodate for 220 cfs flows; excavating pools and installing fish-hook vane structures to improve low flow trout habitat; and re-establishing riparian vegetation to prevent further erosion. At a minimum, the project will include the following: moving three mid-channel bars, installing 14 fish-hook vanes, excavating 18 pools, installing 27 bank full benches to narrow the channel, installing 226 willow clumps and installing a rock [...] (Read More)

  • Shirley Basin Area Sage Grouse Habitat Management

    The Shirley Basin watershed area provides habitat for a variety of wildlife species including identified core areas for greater sage grouse, as well as historic sage grouse ranges outside of core areas. Project objectives center around bringing upland and riparian vegatation, wildlife habitat, and watershed health towards a condition that will better benefit, Sage Grouse. Improving areas of nesting habitat as well as brood rearing habitat for grouse will be the major focus is the Shirley Basin area. The Shirley Basin watershed area provides habitat for a variety of wildlife species including greater sage-grouse Core Area. Current landowners, Permitees, Conservation Dist., WGFD, and BLM have identified this area/projects as having [...] (Read More)

  • Sibert Habitat Lease

    Strategies – Include developing a grazing strategy that is adaptable to meet WLCI’s habitat needs and those of the property owner. This plan will include a reporting component to inform WLCI on observed results for this project including reestablishment of native riparian vegetation, wetland improvements, amount of forage left for wildlife use on hay pasture, and camera use to demonstrate wildlife uses during winter. Water resources - Partners Fish & Wildlife Services and NRCS are initiating wetland water improvement projects on this private property. There is also a proposed project to deepen a reservoir to improve habitat for water fowl. The project, via the landowner will reestablishing riparian plant species along triple creek, [...] (Read More)

  • Sommers/Grindstone Conservation Easement

    The project consists of three distinct conservation projects: 1) the Sommers/Todd Place project, 2) the Scott Place project, and 3) the Duke Place project. All three projects combined encompass approximately 19,000 deeded acres located at two critical locations along the Green River in northern Sublette County and at an important corridor and buffer area between the Bridger-Teton National Forest and the Green River. Sommers/Todd Place: This portion of the porject encompasses over 5,100 deeded acres along the Green River. The ranches are contiguous and are located on both sides of the Green River. It is located along the west flank of the Pinedale Anticline natural gas field. The project includes a conservation easement on the surface [...] (Read More)

  • Sweetwater County Invasive Weed Control

    There is a critical need to increase the level of control to minimize the economic and ecological impacts that invasive species cause. BLM has a commitment to Sweetwater County and private adjacent land owners for controlling weeds. Control of noxious weeds is a priority within the local county and the Bureau. Native wildlife species, including elk, mule deer, greater sage-grouse, mountain plovers, raptors, Colorado River cutthroat trout and many juniper obligates, are dependent on native vegetation for successful breeding, nesting, and food. Protection of their habitats is of primary importance. One community at risk is riparian habitat where invasive weeds are displacing native species. Weeds affect streams by changing the vegetation [...] (Read More)

  • Sweetwater River Restoration (Phase II)

    The restoration project constructed a low level dike, headwall, and head-gate at the mouth of the irrigation ditch to move the river back into its original channel. Phase II– The Sweetwater River jumped into an existing irrigation ditch creating a shortened braided channel (3,200 ft) and dewatering the historic single thread channel of 4,958 ft. The steepened channel created a head-cut in the main channel, causing channel incision and severe bank instability throughout the project area. The restoration project constructed a low level dike, headwall, and head-gate at the mouth of the irrigation ditch to move the river back into its original channel. Project completed August 2008. Approximately 12,100 ft of channel down stream was successfully [...] (Read More)

  • Treat Sagebrush Habitat

    This project would increase the diversity and abundance of forbs and invertebrates in riparian and transitional riparian/upland areas. Treatments would include physical manipulation through mowing, imprinting, or just interseeding to create an enhanced vegetative mosiac within riparian or transitional riparian areas lacking in vegetative species and structural diversity. Since there are a number of invasives/exotic plants in the area, the area will be treated before seeding to ensure the natives species have an advantage. Mechanical manipulation for seed bed preparation, seeding of native seeds and control of invasives/exotic plants will be handled through contracts. This project focuses on improving habitat for a diversity of species, [...] (Read More)

  • Triple Peak Forage Reserve

    Funds are requested to provide financial compensation for the permittee (on a willing seller / willing buyer basis) to waive his allotment complex grazing permit back to the USFS. USFS will then close 5,115 acres to livestock grazing, and place 53,560 into Forage Reserve (i.e. “grassbank”) status, with strict language/terms/conditions under which this portion of the allotment complex could be grazed by domestic sheep. Project implementation will ensure the long-term, sustainable health of vegetative communities and create a forage reserve to facilitate future treatments to benefit fish and wildlife habitats. Improvement of watershed/vegetative conditions in upland and riparian habitats on 58,657 acres throughout the project area will [...] (Read More)

  • Watershed Habitat Mapping and Inventory 2013

    Project Synopsis: project will focus on springs, seeps and reservoirs in sage-grouse core habitat located within the Ruby Priority area. Other species of concern include: Bonneville and Colorado River Cutthroat trout, northern leopard frog, northern leatherside and roundtail chub, flannelmouth and bluehead suckers, big game, raptors and other migratory birds. Water resources will be mapped, inventoried and prioritized for future project/riparian developments. BLM mapped and inventoried approximately 190 reservoirs and 50 springs/seeps in 2011 (approximately one-third of the known springs, seep and reservoirs). BLM would like to continue this project and add to the existing knowledge. By using the data collected in 2011, in combination [...] (Read More)

  • Wetland Construction and Enhancements, Lincoln County

    Approximately 298 acres of seasonal shallow water wetland habitat will be established or enhanced for water birds and waterfowl by constructing and repairing low level dikes and installing 6 water control structures. In addition, permanent water wetlands will be constructed enhance the wetland complex. (Read More)

  • Wheat Creek Meadows Wildlife Area Boundary Fence

    Wheat Creek Meadows Wildlife Habitat Area (WCM) is a 1600 acre wildlife habitat area acquired by the BLM through a land exchange in 1988. It lies 15 miles north of Kemmerer, Wyoming on the south end of the Wyoming Range. The property has two perennial streams, Wheat and West Willow Creeks. The main goal for WCM was to provide protection of wildlife habitat and wetlands with special emphasis on maximizing the potential for wildlife species production and diversity. The area provides habitat for many Special Status Species including the sage grouse, white-faced ibis, sage sparrow, sage thrasher, loggerhead shrike, Brewer’s sparrow, pygmy rabbit; and possibly even the Idaho pocket gopher, yellow-billed cuckoo, northern leopard frog, great [...] (Read More)

  • YC Ranch - Steppe, Riparian, and Wet Meadow Enhancement

    Constructing 4,800 feet of wildlife passable fence to exclude livestock for 3 years with the development of a long term wildlife and livestock management plan. (Read More)