Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative

Conserving world-class wildlife resources. Facilitating responsible development.

Digital Representation of Oil and Natural Gas Pad Scars in Southwest Wyoming-2012 Update



This map displays data from U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 934 (Garman and McBeth, 2015). A digital database of oil and natural gas pad scars has previously been generated for a 7.7-million hectare (19,026,700 acres) region of southwest Wyoming (Garman and McBeth, 2014). Data Series 934 updates the digital database for the five counties of southwest Wyoming (Carbon, Lincoln, Sublette, Sweetwater and Uinta Counties) and for a limited portion of Fremont County within the WLCI study area using 2012 1-m NAIP imagery and 2012 oil and natural gas well permit information (Biewick and Wilson, 2014). Data Series 934 adds pad scars created since 2009, and updates attributes of all pad scars using the 2012 well permit information. The new database contains 17,404 pad scars of which 15,532 are attributed as oil and natural gas well pads.

Biewick, L.R.H., and Wilson, A.B., 2014, Energy map of southwestern Wyoming, Part B—Oil and gas, oil shale, uranium, and solar: U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 843, 20 p., 4 pls., http://dx.doi.org/10.3133/ds843.

Garman, S.L., and McBeth, J.L., 2015, Digital representation of oil and natural gas well pad scars in southwest Wyoming—2012 update [abs.]: U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 934, http://dx.doi.org/10.3133/ds934.

Garman, S.L., and McBeth, J.L., 2014, Digital representation of oil and natural gas well pad scars in southwest Wyoming: U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 800, 7 p., http://dx.doi.org/10.3133/ds800.

FGDC Metadata(Pad Scars) Sciencebase Item Entry
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This map displays data from Digital Representation of Oil and Natural Gas Well Pad Scars in Southwest Wyoming—2012 Update, produced by Steven L. Garman and Jamie L. McBeth, available at http://dx.doi.org/10.3133/ds934. The recent proliferation of oil and natural gas energy development in the Greater Green River Basin of southwest Wyoming has accentuated the need to understand wildlife responses to this development. The location and extent of surface disturbance that is created by oil and natural gas well pad scars are key pieces of information used to assess the effects of energy infrastructure on wildlife populations and habitat.